What Works For You?

Are you one of the millions who pays attention through blogs, Tweets or books to the ways that those who have “made it” structure their lives?

Do you follow people, learn their habits and work to implement some of those things into your life? Me, too.

Do they work? Do you stick to them? Do you really know what works for you? Because if you don’t know then you’re not testing them well enough.

To me it’s not the ‘working’, it’s the ‘knowing’.  If someone else’s routine or plan for a situation is a good one for you then for sure you should steal it! If not, then you should pitch it and find another way.

Development of an assessment system that you can use for everything from morning routines to practice planning to developing players and assistants is a key to moving forward.

Test it. Ready, set, go.

Hey, Opponent…What’s Your Secret?

Coaches, we hear, “know thyself” all the time. Starting by doing the work to know what we value, our team’s strengths and holes in our game can certainly help you in preparing your team for a competition.

Also, know your opponent.  On the face of it, a good scouting report on their players can be helpful on game day.

Dig deeper, however, watch your competition with a holistic eye. Pay attention to the undercurrent,  feel the ebbs and flows of their style and energy. Aim to see holes where they don’t even know they have them.

Find the “secret” to their game, the go-to or the “hope not”, the points in a game where they are most vulnerable or lose their positive energy…see those and attack them there and then.

Fake It ’til You Make It

Then what?

If you make it, then you’re a fake?

Making it ain’t all that.  Faking it’s just what we do. It’s all a fake operation until we test it, believe in it and make it a must-do for our personal system. Even then you might not be fully bought in.

So, yes, “fake it”, but don’t call it that. Be, then do, then you have what you have.

Rinse and repeat and love the mess!

What About What Might Happen?

Forward momentum is enhanced by testing, guessing, making mistakes and accepting partial credit or incomplete solutions.

We’re told to work intentionally now, but…be ok with thinking about the future, but…not too much.

We pass along this approach to our players, too.

The present is important, yet fleeting.  It’s easy to either be complacent, or consistently dissatisfied.

Do you feel this? Do you pass along this angst to your team?

Working to be our best, currently, is really all we can do.

It takes an inner peace (conscious or not) to be satisfied right now, to not ruminate on the past or solely anticipate the future. When “what about…” comes into play we become less content.

 

The time is now!

So they say. For most, “the time is now”, means that pretty soon we’d better get ready to try to act. Pretty soon, as in: not right now, but sometime soon.

Mindfulness is the word of the moment (get it?), “live in the present” is something we encourage and cajole our future selves to do, and yet things don’t get done.  They get thought about, planned, to-do listed…but done?

It’s time to start doing.  Share it, invite comment, see what others think, see if it works. I’ll go first.

Fear of Not Missing Out

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Who’s missing, and who’s not? There is FOMO, Fear of Missing Out, and there is reverse FOMO…the idea that you’re doing something great, and someone is missing it.

When you wonder why people don’t want to do what you’re doing. When you invite someone and they decline. Do you worry about those people too much and not enjoy yourself as much as you could?

Our obsession with the past and the future, our challenge to enjoy who we are and who we are with at this moment, to be satisfied, period. It’s so easy to get excited about the things our future self is going to do, or to reminisce of times gone by. It’s somehow harder to just enjoy. THIS IS GREAT!, right now, is good enough.

Take time to enjoy those who are there, with you, to make the most of your moment and save your emotional energy for those missing for the next time you see them.

It’s ok for “it” to be less than perfect.