Rule #12

Rule #12 is an example of the “no kidding” kind of rule.

What if you made this “no kidding” rule, and others, a regular part of pre-pitch communication for outfielders, starting at a young age?

It’s not usually the highlight plays that make a difference. Make the routine plays easier with good talk and targeted practice along with enough live balls to make impactful experience.

You’re Being Lied To

“It’s important that, first and foremost, before anything else…”

You are a good teacher, or listener…
You have a morning routine…
You have well-established, stands-the-test-of-time core values…
You have a power pitcher…
You know who you are…

…and so on…

Really you just have to make your best effort at planning to be your best at whatever angle you decide on. Right now. For these people.

Yes, you’ll make changes. It’s ok. You’ll look back and say, “WOW! Was that a crazy ______!” (Ask your Mom for some middle school pictures).

The magic is that there is no magic. You create the tricks. Practice. Stink. Repeat.

#bebrave

Make Me!

Today I asked a college coach in her 3rd year as a head coach what she thinks departments should do to help first year HCs?

“What do you wish had happened?”, that first year, I asked her.

I wish that it was not optional to have regularly scheduled coaching sessions.

I needed help that I didn’t even know about.

I needed someone to ask me questions and reflect my answers.

I wish I had a chance to ask about the mechanics of running a program.

I needed some lessons on head coaching.

Where were we for that coach and the athletes that didn’t get our best product?

Principle #45: Why Not Change?

If you are currently dissatisfied, what’s the downside to making changes?

There are a lot of reasons why we don’t change.  Mostly they have to do with fear.

We fear losing standing or losing face if we admit weakness, and change is seen as admitting weakness, a fact that makes no sense yet consumes us in many areas.  What if we change and lose a game? On the way to improvement we may be seen as “less than”, somehow.

But, if you’re currently not happy with the situation, you are already “less than” a future you may be able to create.

Why not make a change?

Big Me, Little Me

Most people have at least two voices, often competing ones.  We have internal debate. We have the “little voice in my head,” and we have “me”.

The “me” is the Big Me.  The one that others see, the one that takes action, makes speeches, plans practices and leads the team.

Little Me is the internal Me, the one that has doubts, or, sometimes, confidence; the one who wonders if that is a good idea, who tells us we might not be good enough.

For many of us, the Little Me is too often a negative voice, the one that says, “this might not work”.

This JV me often holds us back. Don’t let the little me have too much control. Be honest with yourself.

Be big!