Fight to Be Right

Each time you state what you’re all about, what you stand for, you set yourself up to fight for that moment to moment.

If you are “all about” discipline, for example, you then need to be ready not only to be disciplined in your actions but to fight for the belief that discipline is important.

It has to work.

Growth spurt

When was the last time you had a growth spurt?

Most likely you’re not getting taller, and you work hard to not get wider, but could you be growing otherwise?

Looking ahead in a way that makes you better by expanding your knowledge base, or asking great, probing questions of yourself, finding ways to expand what you know, or what you believe, or both.

If you need some supplements, then make your journaling habit actually a thing; take a break to take an intentional breath; make making real eye contact a regular habit.

You may find that growth spurt is happening all on it’s own.

It’s Not SOP to Have Standards

Coaching is hard.

It’s actually not that hard to just coach, but to be a Coach. That’s hard.

Recently I had a conversation with a coach in which they noted that coaching seemed to be getting harder! More tough conversations, more hard decisions…

As she looked closer it was the simple yet challenging act of communicating and holding everyone to program standards that made it hard.

All change is hard, yet having standards as standard operating procedure makes everything easier. Clarity is queen.

A, B, C Players

Coach, do you rank your players on various metrics? Maybe even as simple as “he’s an A player, but has a B (or C) attitude”. If you use numbers, does a “1” player with a “3” attitude equate to a kid who’s a “2” in both in your estimation?

Putting aside the fact that I’d like to know your qualifying standards (how do you measure??!?), is averaging the way to go? Do you have a number that you’d like your team to be at?

What’s the optimal combination of traits and of players?

Why not define the standards and hold everyone to all of them instead?