It’s Personal

When someone says, “it’s personal”, they usually mean that they don’t want to talk about that it.

It’s often used as a replacement for, “none of your business”, or “leave me alone”.

So, let’s say what we mean.

Almost everything we talk about is personal. Most humans talk about their own thoughts & feelings more than anything else.

No more using “it’s personal” as an excuse. Be precise with your language.

Good Times

How often do you hear people say, “I have so much time, it’s amazing how much I’m getting done,” or “I’m going to get to work and finish this project right now, because I can. I have the time and will feel great about it later.”

Not often.

Note that even these comments involve doing things, rather than being someone, somewhere or something.

Time seems to only be scarce. Of course, it is a finite resource and that fact seems to make us nervous. “Life is short” could easily be expressed as “I am going to enjoy today”, but somehow it has become important to talk more about what we don’t have than the abundance we truly face.

Working to do things NOW and to be truly present to myself and others is on my list in 2019. Let the good times begin!

Bumpers

Safety nets, guide wires, bumpers, reasons to be fearless without repercussion. 

Is that what’s really good for us?

Do we need to be sure to have a “feel good” practice before a big game? Do you know for sure that’s the best thing for you or your team or do you just think it is? 

What happens if she fails for real? Throws a gutter ball or falls on her face, even literally?  

I think that the toughness comes from getting up and dusting oneself off. 

Allowing failure to occur is not the same as encouraging it. 

Unnatural

It’s not in most of us to first think of others.

Should we actually put others before ourselves?

What if we simply thought of others’ interests in the same way we think of our own…if we valued interests, opinions and perspectives that didn’t mirror ours exactly?

Sounds simple.

This being outside ourselves takes practice. And, a good practice requires willingness to fail, to test limits and clean up edges.

Instead of starting with, “I/we need to be more empathetic,” how about, I’m going to take a deep breath and see if I can consider another’s perspective one time today.

Building Culture is Simple

  1. Pour the foundation.  What are you all about, Coach? ID your drivers, your values, the things that you insist upon, or wish you did.
  2. Frame it.  Determine the language and lens that you’ll use to see the creation of the program and team.  What are the critical pieces?  There is no shame in asking your people here either. Get consensus, have great conversations.
  3. Get the tools in line & get everyone to agree on the floor plan.  Determine what the finished product will look like if it’s great.
  4. Decorate.  What’s this season’s slogan? Do you have a hashtag? A secret handshake? A goal that everyone can get in line with?

Number 1 is mostly driven by the leader. The head coach, the person at the top.  YOU must have an idea of the central principles by which you’ll drive the program and from there you can, and should, include all of the important people.

Start there.  Simple.  Not easy.

Make It Up

When people don’t know what’s going on, they make something up.

Most are uncomfortable with the feeling, “I don’t know,” so they insert a story into the situation. It’s really a part of the human condition.

Do any of these sound familiar?

“She must just be a &#^&$ ,”, or “He’s just reacting to that thing that happened.”, or “I’m pretty sure that those guys are not the kind of guys we want to hang out with.”  

Things go south QUICKLY on teams when things are not easy and communication is not valued.  Or perhaps good “communication” is not defined well to be understood among the individuals, and so people have to make up stories to fill the gaps in understanding. 

What if coaches made it their top priority to define great communication, display the standards through positive and negative examples and talked about it

every

single

day?

Would that help?


Principle #106: Leaders Are Believers

Or, put another way, only people who believe are likely to be followed.  

As a “leader” one must have the values and principles of the program or organization not just committed to memory, but embedded in the fiber of their being. They must get energy from these things, and thus will transmit energy to others in their world.

To believe you must know, and you must work to be sure that ALL of the people important to the organization also know; that they look through the lens of the values and speak the language of the principles and standards.

True belief in an action, even if the outcome it uncertain, is a mark of a real leader.

Planning matters, plans are useless

Checking boxes, feeling productive when you get thru a pile of emails that have no real impact on your work, taking a deep breath and being relieved when the “workday” is over…FEELS GREAT!

We often celebrate “getting %*&@#$ done” without assessing whether or not we are actually moving forward.

What if we spent more time considering the bedrock concepts that drive us and our business/team/operation?  If we dug into the why, the reasons behind, the what-if-it-worked, we might have more impact.

Spend time working on the plans, working the process (sound familiar?) to create a great plan and the execution itself will be easier. 

Passion is my passion

Do we really need to find our passion? Or, even a passion at all? Is this a requirement for happiness as much of the world is telling us?

If we’re supposed to have a passion and we don’t feel as if we do, does that mean we are a failure? Does it mean anything? (While I’m at it, is “meaning” really all that important?)

I say be passionate about the thing or things that fuel you passionate bones at the time. Be where you are and do that thing really well…be that person at a high level.

When we take a deep breath and work to be our best current selves I believe we make ourselves and others better without even trying to be something or someone in the future.