Fight to Be Right

Each time you state what you’re all about, what you stand for, you set yourself up to fight for that moment to moment.

If you are “all about” discipline, for example, you then need to be ready not only to be disciplined in your actions but to fight for the belief that discipline is important.

It has to work.

It’s Not SOP to Have Standards

Coaching is hard.

It’s actually not that hard to just coach, but to be a Coach. That’s hard.

Recently I had a conversation with a coach in which they noted that coaching seemed to be getting harder! More tough conversations, more hard decisions…

As she looked closer it was the simple yet challenging act of communicating and holding everyone to program standards that made it hard.

All change is hard, yet having standards as standard operating procedure makes everything easier. Clarity is queen.

A, B, C Players

Coach, do you rank your players on various metrics? Maybe even as simple as “he’s an A player, but has a B (or C) attitude”. If you use numbers, does a “1” player with a “3” attitude equate to a kid who’s a “2” in both in your estimation?

Putting aside the fact that I’d like to know your qualifying standards (how do you measure??!?), is averaging the way to go? Do you have a number that you’d like your team to be at?

What’s the optimal combination of traits and of players?

Why not define the standards and hold everyone to all of them instead?

Booooooring

Coaches, be boring.

Spend the time to know-really know-what you care about, what your language is, what the standards are…what’s this thing all about?

If you have a simple set of terms that work for you on and off the field, a glossary that everyone knows, it doesn’t matter if people have a variety of accents.

Coaches who say the same thing over and over, in a language that people understand are not boring, they are consistent and easy to play for.

And they often win.