Do Your Who

Goals are important, action plans and affirmations can “work”, for sure.

But, it’s what you actually DO that is who you are.

You can wish for things, plan for future events, dictate your future in a journal, business plan or season itinerary.

But, it’s what you actually DO that matters.

You may say that you care about your players. A lot. You might actually, in your heart, care a lot. But unless you show them that, unless you show up for them in ways that matter to them, you aren’t really that caring coach that you think you are.

Look at your current actions to see what really matters to you, and plan your future actions to prove it.

It’s Personal

When someone says, “it’s personal”, they usually mean that they don’t want to talk about that it.

It’s often used as a replacement for, “none of your business”, or “leave me alone”.

So, let’s say what we mean.

Almost everything we talk about is personal. Most humans talk about their own thoughts & feelings more than anything else.

No more using “it’s personal” as an excuse. Be precise with your language.

How Many Pillars Is Enough?

What are the “rules” of coaching?

Do you need to have a handbook? A playbook?

A set of 4-10 pillars that you stand by/live by/teach by?

Is player buy-in the most important thing?

What about “knowing yourself”?

Are you allowed to change your mind? Do you have to change your mind?

You do know that there are secrets out there that only a few have access to, right?

Some of any of these things is probably a good thing…and the wrong ones only invite you to keep working on being better. Isn’t that what we ask our players to do?

No wrong answer. No right answer. I’m just going to keep asking questions.

Coach

The English word COACH is deemed to have been derived from the coach that was pulled by horses decades ago. The town in Hungary that is credited with this invention was called Kocs.

So, the word as we use it in sports and other types of coaching is a metaphor for getting things or people from one place to another. This is the job of a coach.

There are skills involved, mostly really, really human skills like listening, planning, caring, listening (yes, again) and figuring out how to get people to work to make themselves a more highly functioning person, either on their own or in a group/team setting.

Those skills are often overlooked when considered alongside knowledge sets like “knowing the game”, strategy and sport tactics. This second group of things is important, but without the first it’s challenging to really grow people to help make the world a better place.

How will you move people along?

Good Times

How often do you hear people say, “I have so much time, it’s amazing how much I’m getting done,” or “I’m going to get to work and finish this project right now, because I can. I have the time and will feel great about it later.”

Not often.

Note that even these comments involve doing things, rather than being someone, somewhere or something.

Time seems to only be scarce. Of course, it is a finite resource and that fact seems to make us nervous. “Life is short” could easily be expressed as “I am going to enjoy today”, but somehow it has become important to talk more about what we don’t have than the abundance we truly face.

Working to do things NOW and to be truly present to myself and others is on my list in 2019. Let the good times begin!

Hard To Look At

“Warts and all”, is a phrase we use to mean that we accept the failings and the shortcomings of those we love or appreciate, or, perhaps, need.

We don’t typically, however, use this phrase when we talk about ourselves. The “warts” that we know we have (how did warts get such a bad name anyway?) somehow don’t even make it to the front of the stage to get mention when we’re talking our us…or me, or myself.

It’s challenging to look for faults in ourselves. If we knew of them we would have fixed them! Or, would we? Maybe it’s acceptance that takes the place of introspection or deliberation of such faults.

Make time, front of your mind time, to examine the “warts” in your world, to look at the ways you fall short or are lacking.

As we look at our own pains or the holes in our game we may realize that they are either not so bad, or easier to fix than we thought. Either way, it’s liberating in a way to admit to these things, to say, “yes, I could/should/might be better in these ways.”

Lessons from Selma

It’s not what you think.

Selma, Alabama has a ton of history. It did before 1965 and those who live there today continue to make their own history.

I spent 15 hours there this August and was impacted tremendously.

Walking the downtown streets on a rainy Saturday evening it felt sadness coming from the earth. Such important things had happened in this small city, and I could feel both the pride and the frustration from the very few locals I encountered.

The biggest lesson was not about Selma, Alabama, the South or any part of it’s history but about me.   My conceptions of what I was like, what that part of our country (as a New Englander it was hard to feel as if I was even in our country) was like, the experiences of others…wow, what a selfish experience I’ve had.

Time to get out more.

Bumpers

Safety nets, guide wires, bumpers, reasons to be fearless without repercussion. 

Is that what’s really good for us?

Do we need to be sure to have a “feel good” practice before a big game? Do you know for sure that’s the best thing for you or your team or do you just think it is? 

What happens if she fails for real? Throws a gutter ball or falls on her face, even literally?  

I think that the toughness comes from getting up and dusting oneself off. 

Allowing failure to occur is not the same as encouraging it. 

New To You

You see a quote or Google a concept and get some great info…the you realize the resource is from 2 years ago, or five, or twenty five…

Does that make it a bad, old or tired reference?  Maybe. Maybe not.

Good ideas have been around for a long time (and, you probably have some yourself). For sure you can adopt, adapt or customize such concepts others’ ideas to make them work for you.

Consider the content rather than the source. Use your own perspective and situations to decide what might be good for you.

Meanwhile, add to the universe of good ideas and perhaps make someone else’s world better at the same time.