Principle #7 Monsters In the Corner

Did you ever notice that when you shine a flashlight under the bed, or simply turn on the lights, that the boogeyman disappears?

If you have issue in your operation or in any relationship, it works to turn on the lights. Illuminate the concerns, even if you are unsure who is “right” or what the “right” thing to do is.

State the facts, solicit opinions, and see if bringing it out in the open helps to give you ideas as to how to proceed.

“The thing to do” is often super clear after you get a good look at the problem.  Reflect on your values and the lens at which you see the world, and a course of action will show itself.

 

Principle #5: Learn, Intentionally

“Learning from the past” should not be a random thing.  We should have a planning process, make and execute plans and look at them after they are executed.  Ask, “What worked?”, and do more of that and less of what didn’t work.

When someone says they learned their lesson, it’s often simply because a thing didn’t work out, and not often enough because we took the time to review our plans and our actions.

Take time more often to learn–the good and the bad–intentionally.

Principle #102 – It’s How You Make Them Feel

One of the conversations that has stuck with me for over ten years…

“Coach, I figured something out,” she said one April morning. “I’m so used to coaches being the one who yelled at us and made us run, I never thought of them as being on the same team as us.”

She was shocked when she felt support from her college coach.

It’s doubtful that all of her coaches before that were “against” her and her teammates, or that yelling was the top activity.

Yet, she FELT that way…the prevailing FEELING about coaches was of being criticized, “yelled at”, even if voices weren’t raised, and of being on the other side.

Recognize how people feel in your presence. Your words may not be as important as you think.

Principle #78 Orchestrate

Coaching By Numbers

Precept #78: A coach is like the conductor of an orchestra.  They don’t play an instrument, often didn’t write the score and usually doesn’t even face the audience…but they had better know each and every player, part and measure of the performance inside and out, before and during the concert.

They must ensure that the intensity and pace are correct, that each player knows their role and can execute it–preferably to perfection–throughout the piece. The conductor is responsible for knowing their people well, to read body language and facial expression, to have the music coursing through their veins…

Get out the baton.

Unbalance. Is that bad?

What is Work/Life balance?

Anyway, is it “Work/Life”, “Work & Life”, “Work, Life”, “Work-Life”, or maybe “worklife”…what’s the right punctuation?

We’ve grown to use this phrase as a way to talk about the fact that some people work too much, or some people think that others work too much.

Can’t work be a part of life, and vice versa? Is there such a desperate need to separate the two so that we don’t ever think that they can easily co-exist?

Is there really a need to declare any particular hour is to be only for one thing, or another, or that one’s family or friends are “life” and something else is not?  And what about one’s life’s work?!?

Perhaps it’s just me that’s confused, but what if everyone took responsibility for their own view of what to fill their life with? That, to me is life, and work, and balance.